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How this salad could seriously damage your health

From avocados to chia seeds, social media is packed with bloggers evangelising about #foodspo #healthyeating recipes. But beware the calories in those Kilner-jar salads – even the most nutritious foods could sabotage your weight loss goals.

Eating a healthy and nutritious diet is a good way to stay on top of your weight, but be wary. Just because something is “healthy”, it doesn’t mean that it won’t cause you to put on weight. There’s a big difference between nutritious and low-calorie or low-fat.

Here are some of the most common culprits:

Juice

Who doesn’t know someone who’s been on a “juice-cleanse”? Tempting as it is to tell them that detoxing is what their liver and kidneys are for, juices can also hide a very high level of sugar. In a juice, you’re getting all of the sugar from a fruit, without getting the fibre, which means it enters your bloodstream faster and can cause a blood sugar spike. The average juice bar carton also contains far more fruits than you would normally eat in a day (in their whole form).

Nuts

Packed with protein, vitamins and minerals, a handful of nuts also contains hundreds of calories. Just eight walnuts contain 200 calories and that’s before they’ve been roasted (which destroys their nutritional content) and covered in salt, sugar or both!

Granola is pretty much glorified flapjack. Many recipes include salt, maple syrup, honey, oils and nuts, lots of nuts…

Salad dressing

Choosing a salad over a sandwich might make you think you’re opting for a healthier lunch, but not if you’re unintentionally super sizing your portion and adding calorie-laden dressings. Most dressings call for a serious amount of oil – all of which contain around 120 calories per tablespoon.

Soup

The perfect rainy day lunch, soup is a great way to get your fill of your five-a-day, but look closely at how it’s put together. Milk, cream, cheese and salt can all lurk in an innocent-looking chowder/ What’s more, most shop-bought soups are portioned for two people, not just one.